The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine.

A Helmi with a conscience: a colab with Les Trouvailles d’Amandine

The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine. The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine. The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine.

I know I said I was done with simple basics, but for me this Helmi shirt in check ticks all the right boxes:

  • A simple, but super flattering cut
  • An unobtrusive pattern that’s a step up from my usual plain
  • Fabric that’s organic and made in France
  • Plus that collar 😍

Look, sometimes you just need a good, elevated basic in your life, right?

Elevated basics for the win.

And this version is a particular win given the fabric is the result of a very special collaboration.

Read on to find out more on this lush fabric, and my personal fitting victory (honestly, I’m kinda ashamed to admit I’d never done this before this make)

Fabric

You may not know this, but Im currently one of the ambassadors for Les Trouvailles d’Amandine – an organic fabric company based in France.

A little while ago I was browsing around Instagram (as you do) when I came across a call for seamstresses to collaborate with the French brand. I don’t normally join in with searches or calls, but I’ve been really keen to explore more eco-friendly approaches to my sewing and I was really taken with their range of organic fabrics. So I applied – and woohoo ! – was accepted.

For my first project I used this organic check sateen. It comes in lots of colourways (this newest one is a current obsession), but I was particularly smitten with this berry colour. Its not your typical plaid which makes it a little bit more unique

It’s a nice shirt-weight fabric, so I guess it’s no surprise I decided to make a shirt πŸ˜„

Pattern

I knew I wanted to make a shirt, and was playing around with ideas of making a shirt dress. In the end, the drape (less drapey then I would use for a shirt dress) made me think a typical shirt would be the best option.

Also, the check in this berry colourway makes me think of plaid shirts and I like that this is a bit of a play on that concept for autumn: plaid shirt 2.0

I have a few trusty shirt patterns (the BHL Sarah and Grainline Archer being two firm faves) but I was keen to use a pattern with minimal style details to let the check shine.

I’ve been a big fan of Named Clothing’s Helmi ever since it came out last year so it was a bit of a no brainer.

In fact, I made my Helmi dress this time last year, so maybe there’s some deep Helmi gene that gets turned on at this time of year 😁

The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine. The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine. The most amazing fit DIY check shirt. Details on how I made this Named Clothing helmi shirt using organic French fabric from Les Trouvailles d'Amandine.

Alterations

So, can I just tell you how excited I am about this next thing. Are you ready? Are you sitting down?

Guys, I did my very first-ever FBA.

I know, right?

Sure I should have probably learned to do this a bazillion years ago, but I did it, and, guys, there is no going back:

I’m basically team FBA for life and there’s no stopping me now.

Apart from that I cut a straight size US 2/UK 6, and used the FBA to adjust the fit.

I also decided to try an finish the collar with a bit of velvet ribbon, just to add a bit of interest. Sadly, you can’t see the detail in these photos, but will try and take a close up soon to share, cause it’s pretty darn nifty (if I do say so myself).

I overlayed the velvet over the join between the collar and the shirt back. I kinda made up the process for applying it so (naturally) it kinda went a bit wrong. But it’s only really an issue if I wear this with the collar standing up – which isn’t going to happen, so, phew!

Verdict

I’ve actually been wearing this quite a lot with black jeans or under sweaters. It can look a bit dark (especially with black jeans) so I’m keen to maybe mix this in with some brighter/lighter colours.

Obviously the FBA means it’s probably the most flattering shirt I’ve ever worn – which has got to be a result. Plus the fact that it’s been made with organic fabric means I’m boosting my eco-conscious sewing credentials.

I’ve got a few more projects planned with Les Trouvailles d’Amandine so watch this space – there’s going to be some real doozies!

I only ever share products and people I think you’ll like as much as I do (because sharing is caring). The fabric for this was kindly provided byΒ Les Trouvailles d’AmandineΒ (they’re nice like that). All thoughts and opinions are 100% my own.

  1. Reply
    Lynne

    Isn’t it a fabulous pattern. I did get a bit stuck doing the placket, but got it in the end! Your idea of adding velvet to the collar stand is fabulous….. I will try that next time. Great blog, thank you XX

  2. Reply
    Lander Pants 2.0 + tips for sewing with canvas - Randomly Happy

    […] Right, let’s talk about the fabric first. Me and a few others are green seamstress ambassadors forΒ Les Trouvailles d’Amandine – an lush organic fabric company based in France (you can see my first post using one of their check fabrics here). […]

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