Lander Pants 2.0 + tips for sewing with canvas

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

The Lander pants have landed (again).

Despite building woes, winter bugs, and dreary weather (you don’t even want to know) I managed to sew up a pair of Landers in February. And man, am I ever glad I ignored the urge to binge-watch Scrubs.

Let’s be honest, you’ve probably seen these around. You know they fit like a dream on absolutely everyone and are about 100% on-trend. 

But did you know, they’re actually pretty easy to sew as well? True story.

I know I’ve written about this pattern before (you can read all about the Lander shorts I made for my tester version here), but I just can’t recommend this pattern enough. I know a lot of people have been on the fence about making these so let me put those fears to rest and get into some of the juicy details.

Fabric

Right, let’s talk about the fabric first. Me and a few others are green seamstress ambassadors for Les Trouvailles d’Amandine – an lush organic fabric company based in France (you can see my first post using one of their check fabrics here).

I know I may be a little biased, but I think they’ve got a great collection of fabrics – and the fact that they’re organic and made in france really just closes the deal. Honesty, the samples they sent were all so lush.

For this project I thought it would be cool to try canvas. Funnily enough, my last pair of Landers was made in a canvas. I don’t know what it is about this pattern that my mind keeps bringing me back to canvas. But it’s such a strong pattern I really think it pairs well with sturdy fabrics.

I really like the weight of canvas. It’s strong and durable, and not a million miles different to working with denim. The canvas I used is a typical weight canvas (the website says it’s 290m3) which isn’t far off most heavy denims so I guess it’s not too crazy.

Still, canvas takes a bit of getting used to. So I collected some tips on working with canvas as I went along – scroll through to the end to read my favourites.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

 

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

All the tips you need to know to use canvas to make your own True Bias Lander pants - or any other make. Go on put some pop into your handmade wardrobe.

Pattern

You know the Landers by True Bias by now – wide legged, exposed button fly, high-waisted. And. Fit. Of. dreams.

I think it’s probably also worth saying that the instructions are really clear and accessible, so don’t be put off by the fact that they’re pants/trousers and have buttons. Kelli makes it all really straight-forward.

Also, Kelli has the niftiest way of finishing a waistband – folding the bottom edge of the inside waistband over the seam by a smidge and then sewing in the ditch from the front side. I’m not explaining it well, but it will change your life (no more slip stitching by hand or having to topstitch).

I promise. Life changing. 

Construction and Fit

Just like my previous pair I made a straight size 6. The fit probably looks a bit different between the two because my shorts were a tester version – I understand that Kelli changed the rise before releasing the Landers to the wider public.

On this pair I really wanted to experiment with adjusting the back to fit my sway back (a.k.a. a really pronounced back arch). I tried cutting a front and back waistband so I could take a wedge out of the back. In my head this made the most sense, but curved waistbands are best for waists that sit on the hip – but for high waists a rectangle shape gives the best fit.

So I recut the waistband from the original pattern and after some investigating I used the typical approach to adjusting for sway back – thanks to Heather for a super clear tutorial on this. It still needs some tweaking, but I’m really happy with the fit.

Right now the hems are temporary – I just folded up about 3″ and sewed the hems without finishing. I want to work out the best length depending on the shoes I wear the most. They’re a bit uneven (oops!) but it hasn’t stopped me wearing them, every dang chance I get!

Tips for sewing canvas

So I wanted to finish by giving a few tips for working with canvas when sewing clothes. Canvas takes a bit of getting used to, but with a few tips it’s actually quite a dream to work with!

1. Use a 90 or 100 needle – a jeans needle works equally well.
2. Use scrAps of folded fabric to make sure the sewing foot is level when starting on an edge
3. Feel free to skip the interfacing – you don’t really need it with such sturdy fabric
4. reduce bulk where you can by skipping small detail (like belt loops)
5. Grade like a demon – you want to avoid adding bulk at the seams and darts.

I only ever share products and people I think you’ll like as much as I do (because sharing is caring). The fabric for this was kindly provided by Les Trouvailles d’Amandine (they’re nice like that). All thoughts and opinions are 100% my own

  1. Reply
    Naomi

    Instead of a swayback adjustment have you tried a full seat adjustment? I have just spent all week pants fitting so have been looking at sooo many resources; it seems like your dipping waistband and few under-bums lines might indicate the need for more room in the seat. I had a similar fit on my landers and they look awesome but were uncomfortable to bend/crouch/sit in. I ended up adding in more at the seat and inner thigh – plus removing some for the swayback. This is not a fit criticism by the way (!) – they do look fantastic on you and I am not bothered by drag lines, I just thought I would suggest it as you mentioned they still needed tweaking. I love this pattern but because it has so little ease I have heard a few people saying that they needed to add more in. I think you have sold me on the long length, they make you look so tall!

    1. Reply
      randomly_happy

      Naomi, you’re a genius! What great advice (0 offense taken! 😀). Will look into full seat adjustments and see what comes up. Thanks so much for taking the time to leave a comment!

  2. Reply
    Anastasiya

    Never heard of them, but now I NEED them) Thanks.

    1. Reply
      randomly_happy

      Oh Anastasia, you DEFINITELY need a pair or two in your life 😂

  3. Reply
    Margaret

    What about stretch? I sewed a pair of cotton canvas pants once and not too long after wearing them the stretch was out by several inches. Any work around for rhat?
    But the pants look great!

    1. Reply
      randomly_happy

      Such a good question! I had the same problem with a pair of jeans I made – they bagged out after a few hours of wearing. I think the fit around the waist is the key with this, so I think I’d be tempted to insert an elastic in the back waistband – not to change the waistband, but to support the band from getting too baggy. Maybe Google elastic waistband non-stretch and see what comes up?

  4. Reply
    Nichole

    Lovely pants! I’m looking forward to sewing them up in this year’s Sew My Style challenge. Your tips are helpful, I’m bookmarking this post.

  5. Reply
    Abigail

    I’ve never worked with canvas before, is it comfortable to wear?

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