Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy

Papercut Kyoto sweater (+ breaking out of a wardrobe slump)

Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy

If you follow me on Instagram you’ll know that I’ve really been stuck in a wardrobe funk recently.

Like a mega funk.

The mother of all funks.

I know it happens to all of us, but it was really sapping my creative energy. And being a maker without anything to make is just not fun. πŸ˜‰

So I decided to stop sulking and to do something about it. I’ve been reacquainting myself with my capsule wardrobe process – which you can read more about in my Maker Capsule series (first and second posts here).

After a bit of a review and some intense inspiration gathering (read Pinterest and Instagram stalking) I narrowed down the source of my funk – basics. Namely, my wardrobe is just too full of basics.

Now you know I love a good basic but a wardrobe full of basics is hardly going to set the pulse racing, is it now?

So I knew I wanted my next make to be fun but simple. But also something that would give me some instant gratification. That’s when I spotted the Kyoto and it all just clicked.

The pattern

The Kyoto sweater/tee is one of Papercut Patterns releases last year. I’m not sure why it’s taken me so long to appreciate it, but it’s a cracking pattern. Feminine and simple (simply feminine). Exactly what I’ve been looking for.

Essentially, it’s a slouchy, drop sleeve top with ruffles attached at the join between the sleeve and the bodice. There’s a sweater version with long sleeves and cuffs for the arms and hem. The top version has short sleeves and the sleeves and hem are finished by hemming.

Sidenote: there are a lot of really interesting patterns in this collection, which I don’t think I had really appreciated before. Expect further investigation in the future!

Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy Find out more about this merino wool Papercut Kyoto tee and how it's helped me break out of a recent wardrobe slump | over on Randomly Happy

The Fabric

This here is some beautiful premium merino from The Fabric Store. It’s lightweight with a decent amount of drape. And perfectly snuggly.

I’m excited to tell you all that I’ll be working with The Fabric Store over the next few months as a brand ambassador. Now if any of you happen to have used their fabrics before you know this is no great hardship. When the Fabric Store comes a knocking, you answer, am I right? πŸ˜„

I’ve sewn with their merino before and know it’s incredibly well-behaved. It’s ethically sourced too which is always a bonus.

This particular colour is mushroom which is a really warm beige. It shouldn’t work on me (beige and I are not friends) but I really love the colour.

Construction

I made a size XS based on the finished measurements of the pattern. To be fair, I was between an XS and an XXS, but opted to go larger for my first attempt at this pattern.

I also moved the neckline up by about 1″. I followed the line for XL neckline instead of the XS neckline which raised the neckline but still kept the original shape of the pattern.

Next time

I think this is a sweet take on a sweatshirt which is great for weekends. But I’m also kind of keen to explore how to take this up a notch. To make it even more feminine.

Shout if you think otherwise, but I think there are a few tweeks that could easily achieve this. First, I think 1 inch needs to be taken off the bodice at the sleeve so the ruffle sits higher on the shoulder. Then I think I could do with removing some excess fabric from the underarm.

I’d also be keen to narrow the neck so it’s more of a crew neck. Maybe it’s just me, but I’ve noticed a lot of patterns seem to be favouring wider necks at the moment. Which is cool, but I have a really low tolerance for tees peaking out from under sweaters!

Of course, this could probably all be achieved by sizing down, but I like a bit of a challenge πŸ˜„

  1. Reply
    PsychicSewerKathleen

    I’m a huge PaperCuts fan myself and this latest collection is gorgeous! I have 2 of them sitting on my cutting table now πŸ™‚ The Sapporo Coat and the Aomori Twist top but I don’t have Kyoto and I love yours! I agree this is a pattern you can have fun playing with – I think raising the shoulder seam an inch is inspired! Those dropped shoulders are not my best look (emphasized with a frill!) I have narrow shoulders, large bust, long neck and dropped shoulders just seem to sing a song of the turtle when I look in the mirror πŸ™‚ I was a even hesitant about the Aomori for the same reasons but I just couldn’t resist it πŸ™‚

  2. Reply
    Dream Aloud

    Lovely sweater! I like this pattern πŸ™‚

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