Makes: Megan Nielsen Dawn Jeans with a simple front hack

Pattern and fabric kindly gifted from Harts Fabric. Concept, views and content 100% my own.

Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.
Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.
Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.
Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.

I mean you all know how much I lurve wide legged 70s styles (see these landers as proof) And these Dawn jeans are basically the jeans version of all my 70s dreams come true: pale denim. High waisted. Flare for days.

So of course this had to happen.

I also did a little modification/hack to remove the front pockets. Mostly for aesthetics and practicality (I mean, I NEVER use front pockets). But also I knew it would cut down the sewing time. And as I’ve got little Viggo to manage any time saving is a bonus.

I’d love to tell you this hack was very complicated and that I’m a very clever person, but really it was the easiest hack I’ve ever done (even easier then this maya top hack).

An easy hack + the perfect pair of 70s jeans? What are we waiting for, let’s get to it.

Pattern – Dawn Jeans

I had my eye on Megan Nielsen’s Dawn jeans pattern as soon as they were released. Something about the high waist mom/mum jean is really appealing at the moment. Throw in the fact that there’s 4 – yup that’s 4 – different leg options and I knew this was the pattern for me. I’m a sucker for a pattern that has multiple options.

But I also do my research. And thanks to Google image search and heavy Instagram tag stalking I could see this is a universally flattering pattern. Everyone looks good in Dawns. And when your investing this amount of time in a make – because making jeans is no joke time wise – you want that investment to pay off. So seeing a huge number of people look great in this one pattern was a huge endorsement. Straight to the top of my to-make pile they went.

I chose to make the wide legged version with zip fly, but the straight version may be on the cards for fall. Maybe in a dark, Japanese selvedge denim. Right?

In terms of size, I made a 10 at the waist and blended down to a 12 at the waist. It’s one of my first times blending between sizes and I’m pretty darn happy with the results. I’ve no idea why I didn’t do this more before.

Fabric

I knew from the start that I wanted to make these in the lightest possible shade of denim. And this shade of pale denim did not disappoint.

It’s a good weight for denim – a cool 10 oz compared to heavier 12 oz or lighter 9 oz. Holds you in without being too restrictive which is always good in a high waisted denim when you’re 6 months post-giving birth 😉

And the colour is perfect. A very soft pale denim colour. Like it’s been left in the sun over the summer.

It does stretch out after a few hours of wear (like most fabrics under pressure). But it’s more something to keep in mind rather than being an issue.

Removing the front pockets from Dawn jeans (or any jeans pattern)

So the juicy bit. Removing the front pockets. It definitely qualifies for easiest hack ever.

I did this on the Dawn jeans, view C, but you could use this hack for any view (or any pattern with jean style front pockets). I’ve put together a little visual illustration, but really it’s as easy as extending the front line to the side seam and then brining the side seam up to meet this line.

Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect.

You’re basically ‘filling in’ the pocket piece and cutting out the fabric without any space for the pocket. You then assemble the jeans as per instructions – ignoring anything to do with front pockets. Basically you just go straight to sewing the side seam with these beauties.

Yup. It’s that easy.

Construction

Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.
Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.
Megan Nielsen's Dawn jeans are basically a 70s dream come true. This easy hack takes away the front pockets, making them even more perfect. It's really a very easy pattern adjustment that works for any jeans pattern. Plus there's a nifty illustration to show you how.

As so many other people have said, the instruction on the Dawn jeans are on point. Super easy to follow and incredibly clear. I’d even go as far to say this would make an excellent introduction to jean making.

sway back adjustment

One thing I did (which is something I’ve gotten into the habit of doing with trousers and jeans – and recommend you do too) is to baste the pieces to check the fit. I’m glad I did because I had some serious gapping going on at the back (side note: does anyone know if this sway back, full thigh adjustment, something else?) It’s basically the bane of my jean/trouser wearing experience. Sigh.

To fix the gapping at the back I basically took a triangle/wedge of fabric out of the back centre seam at the yoke. The triangle was about 4 cm at the top (2 cm either side of the centre back seam) and tapered down to the centre back at the seam between the yoke and the legs. It was an on-the-fly adjustment and I think it actually ended up working out OK. Obviously someone will tell me a better way to do it at some stage 🙂

hems

One minor change I made was leaving the hems undone. I couldn’t decide on the length I wanted (to crop or not to crop) and then kinda started to like the frayed ends. So have left them for now. But you can bet I’ll probably be getting some feedback via the old Instagram to see if it’s a hit or a miss.

back pockets

Finally, I wanted to say something quick on the stitching on the back pockets. I left mine plain as plain can be with just a row of double top stitching across the top, but if you’re making jeans please, please, please consider doing something more fancy. Looking back I wish I’d taken the plunge and done something a little more exciting.

There PSA over 🙂

Verdict

Basically from the start these Dawns have been a real winner in my capsule wardrobe which is even more reduced than usual due to post-baby body. It now brings my current jeans total to 2 – the other being a pair of RTW straight legged mom/mum jeans in a dark wash.

The style is flattering and the high waist means I can add in a few tops that I’ve been reluctant to wear because they haven’t quite covered my belly. The colour has also been great for summer and I have a sneaky suspicion they’ll work well into autumn.

So basically an all round winner. I’m excited to use the pattern again to make a pair of fall jeans – or maybe even a pair of cords to keep the 70s vibe going. In any case. Watch this space!

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